Judge Gives Green Light to Soy Lawsuit

Weston A. Price Foundation Contact: Kimberly Hartke, Publicist
For Immediate Release 703-860-2711, cell 703-675-5557

 

 

JUDGE GIVES GREEN LIGHT TO SOY LAWSUIT

WASHINGTON, DC. October 25, 2011.  Honorable Judge Harold Baker of the United States District Court for the central district of Illinois has ruled that litigation challenging the use of soy foods in Illinois prisons will go forward. In his September 9, 2011 ruling, Judge Baker denied motions by the State and Wexford Health Sources for a summary judgment in their favor, thus bringing the case closer to trial. The ruling emphasized the importance of scientific and medical testimony at the trial.

The trial’s six plaintiffs are represented by the Weston A. Price Foundation, a leading voice on the dangers of soy foods, especially when consumed in large amounts.  Involved in this suit since June 2009, the Foundation is seeking an injunction against serving soy-laden meals to Illinois prisoners. The lawsuit claims that feeding of soy-laden food constitutes cruel and unusual punishment in violation of the eighth amendment to the Constitution, as well as a denial of plaintiffs’ liberty in violation of their due process rights under the fourteenth amendment to the Constitution.  The lawsuit also alleges that the private corporation and its private doctors, Wexford Health Sources, Inc. have been negligent in failing to provide adequate medical care to each of the plaintiffs who are suffering bodily injury and adverse health effects from being fed too much soy. The case is captioned Harris et al. v. Brown, et al., Case No. 3:07-cv-03225.

The use of soy in prison meals began when Rod Blagojevich was elected governor of Illinois in 2002. Beginning in January 2003, inmates began receiving a diet largely based on processed soy protein, with very little meat. In most meals, small amounts of meat or meat by-products are mixed with 60-70 percent soy protein; fake soy cheese has replaced real cheese; and soy flour or soy protein is now added to most of the baked goods.

Early in 2007, the Weston A. Price Foundation began hearing from inmates who were suffering from a myriad of serious health problems due to the large amounts of soy in the diet. Complaints include chronic and painful constipation alternating with debilitating diarrhea, vomiting after eating, sharp pains in the digestive tract, especially after consuming soy, passing out, heart palpitations, rashes, acne, insomnia, panic attacks, depression and symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as low body temperature (feeling cold all the time), brain fog, fatigue, weight gain, frequent infections and thyroid disease.

A related case in Florida, Eric D. Harris versus Keefe Commissary Network and others, number 2011CA000689 in the Second Judicial Court for Leon County, seeks a class action against the Florida Department of Corrections, for use of large amounts of soy in prison meals.  Florida inmates wishing to participate in the lawsuit should contact the Weston A. Price Foundation at info@westonaprice.org.

 

For further information:

www.westonaprice.org/soy-alert/cruel-and-unusual-punishment-soy-diet-for-illinois-prisoners.

 

press@westonaprice.org   (703) 860-2711, cell (703) 675-5557

 

16 Responses to Judge Gives Green Light to Soy Lawsuit

  1. William A. Dennis says:

    President: National Organization Benevolent for Liberation and Emancipation, INC. Florida

    A New York Times report, reprinted Saturday November 12, 2011 in the St. Petersburg Times, alleges “soy based diet” is “cruel and unusual

    punishment,” says inmate lawsuit. The Orlando Sentinel was first to report the lawsuit. Filed in Tallahasse in state court.

    The Plaintiff is serving a life sentence, at Lake Correctional Institution, near Orlando.

    Rarely do inmates touch a handle to: a refrigerartor – stove – microwave – pantry door. Inmates are dependant upon the benevolence of the State of Florida.

    Any Department of Correction ought to provided food, clothing, medical care, etc. as implied by the statutory definition of “corrective custody.”

    Add education and vocational training. The law suit avers: Florida inmates are enduring unfarmiliar and stressful diets. Add possible toxticity.

    This is bad news for poor inmates, and their family, whom try to fill the gap.
    Sally Fallon Morell, of the Weston A. Price Foundation advocates a diet of

    whole, largely unprocessed foods and food high in saturated fats.
    The Foundation is publicizing the lawsuit on its website.”It (soy based diets)

    can have hormonal effects.” Morell adds, “Excessive soy can be toxic to the thyroid gland.”

    Andrea Giancoli, a registered dietitian and spokesman for the American Dietetic Association says “plant protein is more healthful for us, and people who consume

    a more plant based diet have better health outcomes.”
    She adds: “But just because it’s cheaper is not a good reason to be against it.”

    Unfavorable reviews about the evolving use of soy based dietary products and their undesired consequence have been brought to the attention of N.O.B.L.E.

    Inc., Florida before now. Diets vary by country…continent …culture…ethnic group. Is it “cruel and unusual punishment to housed with convicted individuals

    whom have not been corrected, and hungry?” For instance it was puzzling to learn in the 1960s that people of India were starving in the midst of cattle roaming

    their streets. They viewed cattle to be sacred. Folk mistakenly think that Florida Department of Correction facilities are all prisons.

    Florida State Prison in Starke, FL is “the Prison” for the State of Florida.
    Prison is a place to punish, such as “the death penalty.” Althouogh the Prison

    is managed by the Florida Department of Corrections…corrective gains at the Prison…is inmate currency.

    “Correction” is currency needed by an inmate to exchange for the rewards offered to transition into progressive corrective custody.

    Those whom failing to demonstrate the expectations of corrective custody face the prospect of being relocated to the Prison.

    Collectively the three branchs of state government are entrusted with the fiduciary responsibilities to form, make, and create “corrective custody.”

    Yet it is becoming evident that together they fail to understand the mechanics needed, and their roles to achieve the desired effects of the annual billions

    taxpayer invest for improved public safety outcomes. Prison is for punishment. Correctional Institutions are for progressive “corrective custody.”

    Correctional Institutions were intended to be places where “Ex-felons” are produced. Not a place to maim, malign, and confuse.

    by
    W.A. Dennis

  2. candy says:

    genetically modified is not good.

    depends on if the soy is GM soy. they know GM is not good like true plant soy.

  3. emily says:

    we need these inmates to leave prison with a good basis of health mentally and physically, so how is it not possible to deny them at least decent foods to function off of? They are not animals, and if they have acted against society, they are paying their debt by doing their time. This is just uncivilized and inhumane to limit dietary freedom.

  4. Jaime says:

    I am all for suing the soy industry, etc. However, couldn’t you start with SCHOOL lunches rather than with prison food? Or foods marketed toward children? Prison never has and never will produce ex-felons, regardless of what they are fed.

  5. PJ says:

    Soy is Soy

    Candy, it doesn’t matter if the soy is GMO or organic, it still is garbage that damages health.

  6. gloria prater says:

    Soy killed my daughter

    Soy gave my daughter cancer and birth control pills spread it like wild fire. My daughter passed away on Oct. 30, 2011
    She was fed soy infant formula, went into puberty early, menses stopped so put on birth control pill at a young age and she ended up with cancer. The cancer took her life and her unborn child this year. The tumors in her spine got so big they broke her back from the T6 -T11 and fractured her neck (c6). I hope and pray they win this case and set a precedent. And open the door to more lawsuit.

  7. Cindy L. says:

    I agree with another’s comment about campaigning for the health of our children, rather than people who are being punished for breaking the law. Addressing what’s wrong with incarceration today is for another forum.

    Can’t we keep the goals of WAPF clear and true? I can’t think of a better way to put mainstream America off of the principals and ideals of WAPF and their recommendation of a traditional diet than hearing that you’re fighting for better meals for convicted offenders! What about the welfare system, food stamp program, and WIC? Can’t tell you how many baskets of processed food I checked out as a cashier on food stamp payday.

    This is very disappointing to me. I do realize that a case like this gives publicity and visibility to the group, but why bring such controversy to a worthwhile organization such as WAPF?

  8. Alvar van Rijn says:

    This makes total sense…

    I’ve noticed a few comments along these lines: why focus on inmates instead of children?

    What counts is this: the chance of WAPF proving soy is bad for inmates is higher than proving soy is bad for children. It then follows that if soy is bad for inmates it’s also bad for children. Prove one, win the other. It doesn’t work the other way around.

    Why?:
    Were I on the board of WAPF I’d go for the prison as well. It’s the context that counts. It’s relatively easy to prove soy is the culprit in prisons compared to proving soy given in schools is bad for children.
    You have to look at it from a scientific experiment sort of way: a prison is a highly controlled environment, a school is not. In prison environmental issues (toxins, light, water, hygiene, air quality etc), meals per day, just about every variable is the same for all inmates. You can compare data from before and after the introduction of soy, compare to other prisons. This you can prove in a court.
    Now take a school: some children suffer, some don’t. You could argue that some kids have problems and some don’t. Some eat healthy at home, some don’t. Some live in a healthy place, some don’t. It’s a lot harder to prove the negative effect of soy in an open environment.

  9. Shelby Howland says:

    Good For Precedent

    It’s great to see someone taking on the soy industry and I think that it is a great idea to start with a subject that is somewhat removed from major public ears so that the high paid lawyers of the soy industry aren’t so worried about fight with all their might. If this wins then there will be precedent made so that other lawsuits will have a much easier time getting through. If it can be proved that feeding soy is cruel and unusual for prisoner then why would anyone want their kids eating it. this case is a great launching point.

  10. Judy Bernes says:

    Organic fermented Soy is great!

    Dear Gloria Prater, I’m sorry to hear about your daughter but come on, she had to have a lot more going on than eating soy (which has been very safe and a ‘god-send’ to me for years)to put her through all that then eventually succumb. Sorry, soy can’t be a scapegoat here!

  11. Ken Brodeur says:

    The Soy Deception

    Soy, properly fermented is fine, unfermented soy is a neuro-toxin and specifically attacks testosterone. Everyone needs testosterone, we know what it does for men but it is important for women too. Testosterone gives a woman her sensuality and friskiness along with overall health.
    Add GMO soy, which by the way was the first GMO food, and you have a deadly concoction. Feeding prison inmates vast amounts of unfermented soy violates the the constitution as a cruel and unusual punishment. Forget the war on drugs we should outlaw unfermented soy for everyone!

  12. bridget says:

    Why is Soy So Bad?

    Why is Soy so bad? I drink half a cup of steamed soy milk everyday. Is it still bad if it is non GMO and organic? Can someone explain to me why Soy products are no good….other than the fact that they mimic estrogen in the body.
    Thanks so much.

  13. Roja Dove says:

    A society is judged by the way it treats its prisoners

    “..a society that does not try to shape its future ends up being dictated to by its own anxieties.” – Hunt (2004)

  14. jenni says:

    Soy causes estrogen dominance

    @Bridget, why do you need more reasons to not eat soy than ”it mimics estrogen”. Do you think it’s not a good enough reason? Or are you just trying to justify your soy consumption by finding bogus reasons so you don’t feel guilty?. GMO or not, soy causes estrogen dominance by binding to the estradiol (bad estrogen) receptor in your body. It then causes the cancer cells to spread like crazy. You should educate yourself. Start by reading about dr Michael Lam and dr John Lee.

  15. Benjamin says:

    Hi, I just wanted to say, I completely agree with everything your saying about and more, I beleive it also contributes to causing men to become homosexual, Obese, Hypothyroidism, Baldness, premature aging and death and eventually Impotentcy(if the other problems its cause havn’t killed you already). (the very last one I am sure of as I had plenty of hair until after I frank soy for a period of three months and I am still fighting -and losing- a battle against estradiol dominance and hairloss)
    I think that putting soy into food products or feeding it to animals should be a criminal offense punishiable by execution (or worse) this horrid bean has made my life a living hell, (my mother was told to feed me soy milk as a child,& I firmly beleive this is responsible for my “sexual orientation”) and I am sure that many other people have suffered unneccesarily because of this evil plant.

  16. ravi says:

    lovely irony

    … that old Roy is now munching that soy with his good buddies on the inside…

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