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Lacto-Fermentation PDF Print E-mail
Written by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, PhD   
Saturday, 01 January 2000 16:10

It may seem strange to us that, in earlier times, people knew how to preserve vegetables for long periods without the use of freezers or canning machines. This was done through the process of lacto-fermentation. Lactic acid is a natural preservative that inhibits putrefying bacteria. Starches and sugars in vegetables and fruits are converted into lactic acid by the many species of lactic-acid-producing bacteria. These lactobacilli are ubiquitous, present on the surface of all living things and especially numerous on leaves and roots of plants growing in or near the ground. Man needs only to learn the techniques for controlling and encouraging their proliferation to put them to his own use, just as he has learned to put certain yeasts to use in converting the sugars in grape juice to alcohol in wine.

The ancient Greeks understood that important chemical changes took place during this type of fermentation. Their name for this change was "alchemy." Like the fermentation of dairy products, preservation of vegetables and fruits by the process of lacto-fermentation has numerous advantages beyond those of simple preservation. The proliferation of lactobacilli in fermented vegetables enhances their digestibility and increases vitamin levels. These beneficial organisms produce numerous helpful enzymes as well as antibiotic and anticarcinogenic substances. Their main by-product, lactic acid, not only keeps vegetables and fruits in a state of perfect preservation but also promotes the growth of healthy flora throughout the intestine. Other alchemical by-products include hydrogen peroxide and small amounts of benzoic acid.

A partial list of lacto-fermented vegetables from around the world is sufficient to prove the universality of this practice. In Europe the principle lacto-fermented food is sauerkraut. Described in Roman texts, it was prized for both for its delicious taste as well as its medicinal properties. Cucumbers, beets and turnips are also traditional foods for lacto-fermentation. Less well known are ancient recipes for pickled herbs, sorrel leaves and grape leaves. In Russia and Poland one finds pickled green tomatoes, peppers and lettuces. Lacto-fermented foods form part of Asian cuisines as well. The peoples of Japan, China and Korea make pickled preparations of cabbage, turnip, eggplant, cucumber, onion, squash and carrot. Korean kimchi, for example, is a lacto-fermented condiment of cabbage with other vegetables and seasonings that is eaten on a daily basis and no Japanese meal is complete without a portion of pickled vegetable. American tradition includes many types of relishes--corn relish, cucumber relish, watermelon rind--all of which were no doubt originally lacto-fermented products. The pickling of fruit is less well known but, nevertheless, found in many traditional cultures. The Japanese prize pickled umeboshi plums, and the peoples of India traditionally fermented fruit with spices to make chutneys.

Lacto-fermented condiments are easy to make. Fruits and vegetables are first washed and cut up, mixed with salt and herbs or spices and then pounded briefly to release juices. They are then pressed into an air tight container. Salt inhibits putrefying bacteria for several days until enough lactic acid is produced to preserve the vegetables for many months. The amount of salt can be reduced or even eliminated if whey is added to the pickling solution. Rich in lactic acid and lactic-acid-producing bacteria, whey acts as an inoculant, reducing the time needed for sufficient lactic acid to be produced to ensure preservation. Use of whey will result in consistently successful pickling; it is essential for pickling fruits. During the first few days of fermentation, the vegetables are kept at room temperature; afterwards, they must be placed in a cool, dark place for long-term preservation.

It is important to use the best quality organic vegetables, sea salt and filtered or pure water for lacto-fermentation. Lactobacilli need plenty of nutrients to do their work; and, if the vegetables are deficient, the process of fermentation will not proceed. Likewise if your salt or water contains impurities, the quality of the final product will be jeopardized.

Lacto-fermentation is an artisanal craft that does not lend itself to industrialization. Results are not always predictable. For this reason, when the pickling process became industrialized, many changes were made that rendered the final product more uniform and more saleable but not necessarily more nutritious. Chief among these was the use of vinegar for the brine, resulting in a product that is more acidic and not necessarily beneficial when eaten in large quantities; and of subjecting the final product to pasteurization, thereby effectively killing all the lactic-acid-producing bacteria and robbing consumers of their beneficial effect on the digestion.

The lacto-fermented recipes presented in Nourishing Traditions are designed to be made in small quantities in your own kitchen. They require no special equipment apart from a collection of wide-mouth, quart-sized mason jars and a wooden pounder or a meat hammer. (For special sauerkraut crocks that enable you to make large quantities, see Sources in the back of Nourishing Traditions.)

We recommend adding a small amount of homemade whey (recipe on page 87 of Nourishing Traditions) to each jar of vegetables or fruit to ensure consistently satisfactory results. Whey supplies lactobacilli and acts as an inoculant. Do not use commercial concentrated whey or dried whey. You may omit whey and use more salt in the vegetable recipes, but whey is essential in the recipes calling for fruit.

About one inch of space should be left between the top of your vegetables with their liquid and the top of the jar, as the vegetables and their juices expand slightly during fermentation.

Be sure to close the jars very tightly. Lacto-fermentation is an anaerobic process and the presence of oxygen, once fermentation has begun, will ruin the final product.

We have tried to keep these recipes as simple as possible without undue stress on ideal temperatures or precise durations. In general, a room temperature of about 72 degrees will be sufficient to ensure a lactic-acid fermentation in about two to four days. More time will be needed if your kitchen is colder and less if it is very warm. After two to four days at room temperature, the jars should be placed in a dark, cool spot, ideally one with a temperature of about 40 degrees. In days gone by, crocks of lacto-fermented vegetables were stored in root cellars or caves. A wine cellar or small refrigerator kept on a "warm" setting is ideal; failing that, the top shelf of your refrigerator will do. Lacto-fermented fruit chutneys need about two days at room temperature and should always be stored in a refrigerator.

Lacto-fermented vegetables increase in flavor with time--according to the experts, sauerkraut needs at least six months to fully mature. But they also can be eaten immediately after the initial fermentation at room temperature. Lacto-fermented vegetable condiments will keep for many months in cold storage but lacto-fermented fruits and preserves should be eaten within two months of preparation.

Some lacto-fermented products may get bubbly, particularly the chutneys. This is natural and no cause for concern. And do not be dismayed if little spots of white foam appear at the top of the pickling liquid. They are completely harmless and can be lifted off with a spoon. The occasional batch that goes bad presents no danger--the smell will be so awful that nothing could persuade you to eat it. The sign of successful lacto-fermentation is that the vegetables and fruits remained preserved over several weeks or months of cold storage.

Lactic-acid fermented vegetables and fruit chutneys are not meant to be eaten in large quantities but as condiments. They go beautifully with meats and fish of all sorts, as well as with pulses and grains. They are easy to prepare, and they confer health benefits that cannot be underestimated.

Scientists and doctors today are mystified by the proliferation of new viruses--not only the deadly AIDS virus but the whole gamut of human viruses that seem to be associated with everything from chronic fatigue to cancer and arthritis. They are equally mystified by recent increases in the incidence of intestinal parasites and pathogenic yeasts, even among those whose sanitary practices are faultless. Could it be that in abandoning the ancient practice of lacto-fermentation and in our insistence on a diet in which everything has been pasteurized, we have compromised the health of our intestinal flora and made ourselves vulnerable to legions of pathogenic microorganisms? If so, the cure for these diseases will be found not in vaccinations, drugs or antibiotics but in a restored partnership with the many varieties of lactobacilli, our symbionts of the microscopic world.

Copyright: From: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats by Sally Fallon with Mary G. Enig, PhD. © 1999. All Rights Reserved. Available from New Trends Publishing and Amazon.com.

About the Authors

[authorbio:fallon-morell-sally]

[authorbio:enig-mary]

Comments (14)Add Comment
Why should jars be kept tightly closed?
written by Laura @ FermentaCap, Nov 21 2013
If fermented foods were stored in crocks, without tight lids traditionally, why should jars be tightly closed? If they are, then you have to vent them, to keep the pressure from building up - gets messy (potentially dangerous) otherwise. If you close them tightly, you pretty much need an airlock to let the gas safely escape.

Just seeking some clarification here. Traditional fermentation methods were often in open vessels. Closed systems can be more predictable, and airlock systems ARE more convenient to use. But wondering if you are making any specific recommendation.
Lactose Intolerance - Fermented Vegetables
written by Joey, Apr 23 2013
Michelle, you have three different options when it comes to fermentation: whey (which you can't use due to your lactose intolerance), salt (which is a slower process, but some people believe it creates a better taste), or use a starter culture, Which you can purchase online from various websites. Here's one option for you - http://bodyecology.com/control...eCEvF.dpbs

Lacto fermentation refers to the lactic acid produced during the fermentation process, and is not to be confused with lactose.

Good luck!
...
written by Michelle, Feb 25 2013
Cab grape leaves be used regularly in lacto fermentations? I heard that they are good for keeping the vegetables firm but I also heard they contain tanins which I though would prevent nutrient absorption.
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written by Michelle, Jan 11 2013
I have just discovered that I am lactose intolerant. Is there a way to lacto-ferment that will not exacerbate this issue?

Thanks,
Michele
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written by Myra, Dec 14 2012
Mary, I started out fermenting with only the Body Ecology book. I used lots of garlic and ginger, which I believe also inhibit growth of the harmful bacteria. I also used the Body Ecology diet starter packets. It worked out great! Really delicious, strong flavors, and not too sour.
fermentation without whey or salt
written by angela, Aug 10 2012
I am following Body Ecology, and am wanting to begin culturing veggies for the first time. Body Ecology insists that culturing must be done without whey or salt, and I have yet to talk with anyone who has done that. Any experience with this, and advice? I have instructions, but real life experience is so much more helpful.
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written by mary, Jun 27 2012
I am doing ferments for a man who very much wants his kale to be cooked before being fermented, and wants to use canned spinach because he does not like the variety of spinach grown in the country where he lives, but has cans of spinach brought to him from overseas. He prefers the ferments be made with whey only and no salt. Can you please share your reactions to these ideas? I have made several jars of each but I must say I don't feel I have the knowledge to evaluate the result. The canned spinach seems particularly inert.
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written by Jenifer Dickson, Mar 08 2012
I am wondering about dairy allergies. If I make a kraut without using whey, does it need to be an open air fermentation? Or will the microbes from the cabbage do their jobs inside a lidded mason jar? I have always had great (and consistent) luck with the whey method but so many of the people becoming interested are wanting totally dairy free product. Also, can you tell me why sometimes my beet kvass, ginger-ale, kombucha, etc. are sometimes so lovely and bubbly and sometimes flat? And does the bubble effervescent factor equal a better probiotic? Thanks!
Reply to Jennifer from Sally
written by tjboyd, Jan 26 2012
The dried whey will not help with the fermentation process--you need fresh whey with all the microbial activity. Also, the whey proteins are very fragile and can be ruined by the drying process. Really it is best to make fresh whey--a little goes a long way and it lasts a long time.
Whey
written by Jennifer, Jan 25 2012
I just finished 2 lacto-fermenting vegetable recipes from Nourishing Traditions...hooray! I had added dried sweet whey instead of homemade. I was reading further into the book, and it is recommended not to use dried whey. Will this affect the fermentation process or spoil the batch?
Thanks,
Jennifer
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written by Stephen Kunin, Jan 16 2012
Can Sauerkraut which is lacto fermented and is cabbage and salt only (commercial products) and are pasturized, be improved or made healthy by adding real whey?
I have whey i make from yogurt and also would like to buy large jars ready made commerical kraut (which is inexpensive) but would like the benefits of lacto fermented provides..............
Thanks very much,
Steve
Vegetable culture starter
written by Marie, Jul 20 2011
After reading your article above, is it not necessary to use a vegetable culture starter? Could you explain to me why there are vegetable culture starters and why some people use them? I have a very tired / ill gut that I'm trying to heal after being GF for 8 months. If make the lacto fermented cabbage would I need to wait the 6 mths prior to eating it in order for it NOT to cause me problems?

Thank you.
...
written by Don, Dec 04 2010
Is "sourdough sprouted" bread better than "sprouted bread"?
...
written by Nicole Nolte, Sep 29 2010
I just pickled pickles and used a crock. The crock pot was not completely sealed. A little air did get in (1/4 inch gap was open on crock). We did get a little mold that grew in the open air areas of the crock. I'm wondering if this ruined the batch of pickles, will it be bad to eat, can I get botulism from it. I'm a little worried since I saw the mold growing. Everything smells great, so my father said go ahead and eat them. I just want a second opinion though. We did salt brine, for 2 week curing on the counter top in glass jar. Would love to know your thoughts and opinion whether or not they're safe to eat!
Thank you so much.
Nicole

Be sure to close the jars very tightly. Lacto-fermentation is an anaerobic process and the presence of oxygen, once fermentation has begun, will ruin the final product.
We have tried to keep these recipes as simple as possible without undue stress on ideal temperatures or precise durations. In general, a room temperature of about 72 degrees will be sufficient to ensure a lactic-acid fermentation in about two to four days. More time will be needed if your kitchen is colder and less if it is very warm. After two to four days at room temperature, the jars should be placed in a dark, cool spot, ideally one with a temperature of about 40 degrees. In days gone by, crocks of lacto-fermented vegetables were stored in root cellars or caves. A wine cellar or small refrigerator kept on a "warm" setting is ideal; failing that, the top shelf of your refrigerator will do. Lacto-fermented fruit chutneys need about two days at room temperature and should always be stored in a refrigerator.
Lacto-fermented vegetables increase in flavor with time--according to the experts, sauerkraut needs at least six months to fully mature. But they also can be eaten immediately after the initial fermentation at room temperature. Lacto-fermented vegetable condiments will keep for many months in cold storage but lacto-fermented fruits and preserves should be eaten within two months of preparation.

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Last Updated on Thursday, 29 March 2012 13:49